Individual Therapy

Are you struggling with any of the following?

  • Fear, Anxiety, Panic
  • Depression, Loneliness, Shame
  • Overwhelm
  • Grief and Loss
  • Insecurity and Low Self-Esteem
  • Life Transitions
  • Trauma and PTSD
  • Crisis of Meaning

Choosing the Right Psychotherapist

Choosing to enter psychotherapy may be one of the most important and courageous decisions of your life. The relationship itself, between the psychotherapist and client, is one of the most powerful factors in healing and transformation. Therefore, choosing the right psychotherapist is a significant decision.

I bring many years of experience and training to my work. My approach to psychotherapy is informed by Mindfulness, Body Awareness, Humanistic and Depth Psychology, latest Attachment research, Neuroscience contributions to psychotherapy, and Transpersonal Psychology (awareness of a spiritual dimension).

Decision to Enter Psychotherapy

The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.
--Carl Rogers

Stream

We usually come to psychotherapy in a vulnerable state of suffering. Our lives and/or our relationships are not working. We may feel stuck. We have lost our bearings. At times, it can feel as if we are going through a complete disintegration.

It is important to reach out during times of distress. I am here to receive you, support you, and help guide you to access your own innate wisdom and strengths. I receive my clients with compassion and non-judgmental presence.

In our work together, clients emerge feeling deeply understood and validated, with a sense of relief, hope, growing self-acceptance, sense of meaning and direction, and personal empowerment. Clients develop insight and clarity, enabling them to take steps in the direction of positive and lasting change. I build a strong alliance with clients and hold them in a safe container in which to explore their deepest selves.

Honoring Our Wholeness

At times, each of us experiences periods of personal upheaval, change, loss, uncertainty, and darkness, and sometimes a profound sense of wounding and pain. We can choose to embrace ourselves and be embraced during these difficult times. The process of being witnessed with compassion and held securely in our suffering can be deeply healing. We learn to accept these dark places as real, worthy parts of our life story, instead of casting them out as shameful impediments. Wholeness includes all of who we are and all of what we have experienced. We can learn to see our whole story as having deep meaning. We can begin to honor our life and ourselves exactly as we are. We can walk forward with confidence and grace

NANCY WALLINGFORD, MFT
nwallingford1@gmail.com